[PHOTOGRAPH / EARLY MUSLIM THEATER IN ROMANIA] 3 Nisan [1]927 tarihinde “Kanli Intikam”... [i.e., A group of Pazarcik Muslim youngs staged the play "Bloody Revenge" on April 3, 1927]

[PHOTOGRAPH / EARLY MUSLIM THEATER IN ROMANIA] 3 Nisan [1]927 tarihinde “Kanli Intikam”... [i.e., A group of Pazarcik Muslim youngs staged the play "Bloody Revenge" on April 3, 1927]

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N.p., Pazarcik (Dobric – Bazargic), 1927.

COMPLETE TITLE: [PHOTOGRAPH / EARLY MUSLIM THEATER IN ROMANIA] 3 Nisan [1]927 tarihinde “Kanli Intikam” nâm piyesi mevki’-i temâsâya vaz’ eden Pazarcik Müslüman gençlerinden bir grup [i.e., A group of Pazarcik Muslim youngs staged the play "Bloody Revenge" on April 3, 1927].

Original b/w photograph. (9x14 cm). In Ottoman script (Old Turkish with Arabic letters). A very good photograph instead of a slight creasing on the upper right corner. 

Extremely rare gelatin silver showing young Muslim men in their special character outfits in Dobric, Bazargic of Romania, as can be seen from the text on the sign in front of them in 1927. Little is known about the theatrical activities of Muslims in the region.

In the period of the Kingdom of Romania, a monument in the shape of a small mosque was built in Bucharest's Carol Park, as a sign of reconciliation after World War I. A small Turkish-speaking Muslim community resided on Ada Kaleh Island in the Danube, south of the Banat, an Ottoman enclave and later part of Austria-Hungary, which was transferred to Romania in 1923.

At the end of the Second Balkan War in 1913, the Kingdom of Romania came to include Southern Dobruja, whose population was over 50% Turkish (the region was ceded to Bulgaria in 1940). As recorded after World War I, Romania had a population of 200,000 Muslims from a total of 7 million, the majority of which were Turks who lived in the two areas of Dobruja (as many as 178,000). Since 1877, the community has been led by four separate muftiyats. Their number was reduced during the interwar period when the cities of Constanta and Tulcea each housed a muftiyat. (Wikipedia).