[CYPRUS IMPRINT - THE BOOK OF ADVICES - PERSIAN LITERATURE] Pendnama of Shykh Sadee, being a compendium of ethics, in verse,... Pendnâme-i Şeyh Sadi, ilm-i ahlâktan hûlâsa. Translated into English by William Carmichael Smyth Esq.

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[CYPRUS IMPRINT - THE BOOK OF ADVICES - PERSIAN LITERATURE] Pendnama of Shykh Sadee, being a compendium of ethics, in verse, by that celebrated poet = Pendnâme-i Şeyh Sadi, ilm-i ahlâktan hûlâsa. Translated into English by William Carmichael Smyth Esq. Late of the Hon. East India Company's Bengal Civil Service, rendered in Turkish verse by [Vizeli] Ali Riza Ibni Emin [Kayikçioglu], Professor of Turkish Language of English School Cyprus. 

SHEIKH MOSLEHEDIN SAADI SHIRAZI, (1193-1292).

Phone Tes Kypron = Foni Dis Kipru, Lefkose - Cyprus, 1907.

Original wrappers. Cr. 8vo. (19,5 x 13,5 cm). In English, Persian, and Ottoman script (Old Turkish with Arabic letters). 26 p. Abû-Muhammad Muslih al-Dîn bin Abdallâh Shîrâzî, (1193-1292), Persian poet and prose writer, widely recognized as one of the greatest masters of the classical literary tradition. His influence is not limited to Persian literature. He also deeply affected Turkish and Urdu literature and the Western world (Encyclopadiae Iranica). Bostan [i.e. the Orchard] and Gulistan [i.e. the Rose Garden], his famous Works, were translated into many languages and commented. Pendname is one of Sa'dî's poetical works. In this ethical-based work, ethical values such as science, justice, consenting to fate, honesty, patience, generosity, modesty, and grace are praised. Bad habits such as talking to ignorant, cruelty, lie, arrogance, and stinginess are badly criticized. The Persian text of Sa'dî's Pendname, it's an English translation, and Ottoman Turkish translation in verse were printed together in the early 20th century. The work is about some moral characteristics that are seen as "acceptable and submissive" in societies and have been recited with the idea of benefiting people. (Source: A BOOK ON ETHICAL LITERATURE: SAADI'S PENDNAME, Melek Dikmen). Major William Henry Carmichael-Smyth, (1780-1861), was a British military officer in the service of the East India Company and an orientalist. In 1797, at the age of seventeen, he was commissioned into the Bengal Artillery. In 1803, the Second Anglo-Maratha War broke out, and he was present at the battles of Aligarh, Delhi, and Laswari. Carmichael-Smyth returned to India in 1810 as a captain and served in the Invasion of Java in 1811. Thereafter he returned to Bengal and went to Callinger as a field engineer where he was mentioned in dispatches for exemplary valor in 1812. He returned to England in 1820 and was elevated to Major in 1821. Not in Özege.; OCLC 50021435, 1065323294.