[AL-FARIDIYAH: THE EARLIEST ARABIC MYSTIC POETRY IN OTTOMAN LANGUAGE] Ibn-i Fariz hazretlerinin yaiyye, mimiyye ve raiyye kasidelerinin serhidir. Annotated by Mehmed Nâzim Pasha, (1840-1926).

[AL-FARIDIYAH: THE EARLIEST ARABIC MYSTIC POETRY IN OTTOMAN LANGUAGE] Ibn-i Fariz hazretlerinin yaiyye, mimiyye ve raiyye kasidelerinin serhidir. Annotated by Mehmed Nâzim Pasha, (1840-1926).

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IBN AL-FARID UMAR b. ALI SHARAF AL-DÎN AL-MISRÎ AL-SADÎ, (Mystic Arab poet), (1181-1234).

Sems Matbaasi., Ist., [1328 AH] = 1912 AD.

First and Only Ottoman Turkish translation and compilation (also in any Turkish / Turkic language) of 12th-century mystic Arab poet Ibn al-Farid [or Fariz] poems, with Mevlevi poet Nazim Pasha's annotations. This rare book includes Yaiyyah, Mimiyyah, and Raiyyah qasidahs styles of classical Arabic verse.

Paperback. Cr. 8vo. (19 x 13 cm). In Ottoman script (Turkish with Arabic letters). 159 p.

Ibn Farid was born in Cairo of Ayyubid Egypt to parents from Hama in Syria, lived for some time in Mecca, and died in Cairo. His poetry is entirely Sufic and he was esteemed as the greatest mystic poet of the Arabs. Some of his poems are said to have been written in ecstasies. The poetry of Shaykh Umar Ibn al-Farid is considered by many to be the pinnacle of Arabic mystical verse, though surprisingly he is not widely known in the West. Ibn al-Farid's two masterpieces are The Wine Ode, a beautiful meditation on the "wine" of divine bliss, and "The Poem of the Sufi Way", a profound exploration of spiritual experience along the Sufi Path and perhaps the longest mystical poem composed in Arabic. Both poems have inspired in-depth spiritual commentaries throughout the centuries, and they are still reverently memorized by Sufis and other devout Muslims today. Ibn al-Farid claimed to see many things happen that could be considered to be out of this world. He wrote of a lion kneeling down to him and asking him to ride. He also wrote of seeing a man descending a mountain, floating without using his feet. He claimed that a "great green bird" came down at the funeral of the greengrocer and "gobbled up his corpse". He also claimed to have conversed with Muhammad in a dream. Ibn al-Farid's son Kamal al-Din Muhammad described his ecstasies or trances as sometimes lasting ten consecutive days without eating, drinking, moving, speaking, or hearing outside noises. He would alternately stand, sit, lie on his side, and "throw himself down on his side." When he came to, his first words would be a dictation of the verse God had given him. Mehmed Nazim Pasha, (1840-1926) was an Ottoman statesman, governor of Thessaloniki [i.e. Salonica] poet, and translator. He was a Mevlevi. He wrote his mystic poems and he was the grandfather of famous Turkish leftist poet Nazim Hikmet Ran, (1902-1963). Only three copies in OCLC (German and Hungarian libraries, not in the US): 165173565 / 1132595242.; Özege 8358.